HUGUENOT TRACT

Soon after the revocation of the Edict of Nantes, King William III and Queen Mary ascended to the throne of England. This King of England, Scotland and Ireland granted the Huguenots the privilege of settling in Virginia with the promise of land for a home. About 600 of these Protestant Refugees came to Virginia in 1700 - 1704. Many settled at a deserted Indian village called Manakintown, located on the south side of the James River about 15 miles west of present day Richmond, Virginia. Ten thousand acres of land bordering the river was granted to their use in 1704. A district parish was formed and named King William Parish. The Vestry Book 1707 - 1750, written in French, can be found in the library of the Virginia Historical Society at Richmond, Virginia.


Today, the Old Huguenot Episcopal Church and the home of Dr. Pierre Chastain, French Huguenot Refugee Settler, can be found on the tract of land granted to Chastain for his use. Dr. Chastain was one of the original 12 vestrymen of the Manakintown Anglican Church, founded in 1700. That congregation still assembles for worship on the ancient Huguenot Tract of Virginia.

 

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