ANTOINE TRABUE PASSPORT

The original parchment survived time, much travel and a fire in Missouri before its donation to the Virginia Historical Society. At one time it was in the possession of Daniel Trabue, grandson of the French Huguenot Immigrant document holder. Daniel Trabue came to Adair County, Kentucky from Chesterfield County, Virginia after the Revolutionary War. The family heirloom was taken by his descendants on to Missouri where it was found and donated.

The passport is dated 1688 and was needed by the clergy for safe travel in France after the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes. Reverend Trabue's French name may have been Strabu or Straboo according to Daniel Trabue.

Reverend Trabue had an injury to his left eye and this was a mark of identification. It states he was part of the "eglise reforme" or eglise allemand," the German Church, as this would have been the church of Martin Luther. It can be interpreted in the document that he traveled in the area that is now Alsace-Lorraine but during that time was a combination of Swiss, German and French. He was at Schaffhausen, Nuremburg and Lausanne. The document is signed by J. Combe Minitree. A French bricklayer named David Minitree was at Jamestowne by the mid seventeenth century, but it is not known at this time if they had any communication or were related.

Trabue Passport translation courtesy of Anne Stokes Moore and Alain Outlaw.

 

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